Decorative Arts

Willow Ware at Willowwood


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Highlights from the Decorative Arts Collection

By Lesley Parness, Superintendent of Horticultural Education

The Tubb’s brothers keen interest in the decorative arts also included the practical, everyday items of life. At Willowwood, their interest in all things Asian is reflected in statuary, paintings and even dinnerware. A cupboard near the Dining Room stores the typical family daily use Willow Ware dishes, including dinner and serving plates, cup and saucers, bowls, sugar pots, creamers and even some very sweet egg cups which we imagine held freshly laid eggs from the families chicken coop. Some are chipped, others marked with the tracery of use, they bare witness to the fact that Willow Wood was a true home, well-used and the Dining Room, the heart of it.

The Conservatory

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Highlights from the Decorative Arts Collection

By Lesley Parness, Superintendent of Horticultural Education

The botanizing of brothers Henry and Robert Tubbs was a year round passion. So, in 1930 they decided to add a greenhouse to their home. In doing so, they joined a long line of gardeners seeking to extend their horticultural pleasure throughout the year.

The word conservatory is derived from the Italian “conservato” (stored or preserved) and Latin “ory” – a place for – and was originally used to describe a non–glazed structure used for storing food. Later the word was used to describe glazed structures for conserving, or protecting, plants from cold weather.

The Front Parlor

Highlights from the Decorative Arts Collection

By Lesley Parness, Superintendent of Horticultural Education

The Front Parlor of the Tubbs residence is home to a comfortable sofa and several chairs along with a variety of Asian artwork. We know that of the brothers Tubbs, Henry was the one most often found in antique shops here in New Jersey, and New York. His artist’s eye was quick to find the beautiful and the unusual. Here are two examples of his passion for collecting on exhibit in the Front Parlor:

Foo Dog Incense Burner

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Foo Dog Incense Burner
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Highlights from the Decorative Arts Collection

by Lesley Parness, Superintendent of Horticultural Education

While it is certainly true that Henry and Robert Tubbs had a passion for plant collecting, that same passion extended to the decorative arts as well. Learn about a different Tubbs residence artifact in this and upcoming issues of the Willowwood Journal.

In this issue, we focus on FOO DOG INCENSE BURNER, Item number WW2004.12.31 A-C.

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